Pediatric Vaccinations

[Infographic] How to Study: Pediatric Vaccinations

Pediatric vaccinations can be difficult to memorize. Use these acronyms to master them all!

Learn About Pediatric Vaccinations

Some topics you will learn in this infographic:

Age 2 Months:
A 2-month old infant should receive a total of 6 vaccinations: their 2nd dose of Hepatitis B should be given in the 1st or 2nd months of life (1st is given at birth), and their 1st dose of the rotavirus, diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP), haemophilus influenzae type B (HiB), pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13), and inactivated poliovirus (IPV) vaccinations. Many of these vaccines are available in a combination to decrease the overall number of shots given. General contraindications to all vaccinations include serious (anaphylactic) allergic reaction to any vaccine component or previous dose of the particular vaccination and those with severe immunodeficiency. Live vaccines (MMR, varicella, yellow fever, nasal influenza, oral rotavirus) should not be given to immunosuppressed or pregnant patients. 

Age 4 Months:
A 4-month old infant should receive a total of 5 vaccinations: their 2nd dose of the rotavirus, diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP), haemophilus influenzae type B (HiB), pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13), and inactivated poliovirus (IPV), vaccinations. Many of these vaccines are available in a combination to decrease the overall number of shots given. General contraindications to all vaccinations include serious (anaphylactic) allergic reaction to any vaccine component or previous dose of the particular vaccination and those with severe immunodeficiency. Live vaccines (MMR, varicella, yellow fever, nasal influenza, oral rotavirus) should not be given to immunosuppressed or pregnant patients.

Age 6 Months:
A 6-month old infant should receive 4-7 vaccinations. All infants should receive their 3rd dose of the hepatitis B, diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP), pneumococcal, and inactivated polio vaccines. Some infants will need a third dose of haemophilus influenzae type B (HiB) and rotavirus vaccinations, depending on the formulation used. Infants may also receive their first inactivated influenza vaccination as early as six months of age, depending on the time of the year. General contraindications to all vaccinations include serious (anaphylactic) allergic reactions to any vaccine component or previous dose of the particular vaccination and those with severe immunodeficiency. Live vaccines (MMR, varicella, yellow fever, nasal influenza, oral rotavirus) should not be given to immunosuppressed or pregnant patients.

Age 12-15 Months:
At 12-15 months of age, infants should receive 6-7 vaccinations. All infants should receive their fourth dose of the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) and pneumococcal vaccines, their 1st dose of the MMR and varicella vaccinations, and a haemophilus influenzae type B booster. Some infants may receive a 3rd dose of the inactivated poliovirus (IPV) vaccination. General contraindications to all vaccinations include serious (anaphylactic) allergic reaction to any vaccine component or previous dose of the particular dose of the particular vaccination and those with severe immunodeficiency. Live vaccines (MMR, varicella, yellow fever, nasal influenza, oral rotavirus) should not be given to immunosuppressed or pregnant patients. 

Age 4-6 Years:
At 4-6 years of age, children receive their final doses of the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) and inactivated poliovirus (IPV) vaccines and their second doses of the MMR and varicella vaccines. General contraindications to all vaccinations include serious (anaphylactic) allergic reactions to any vaccine components or previous dose of the [articular vaccination and those with severe immunodeficiency. Live vaccines (MMR, varicella, yellow fever, nasal influenza, oral rotavirus) should not be given to immunosuppressed or pregnant patients.

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